Category Archives: Heritage Conservation

Life-size photograph from late nineteenth or early twentieth century

Condition Assessment and Treatment Record A Life -size photograph print that came for treatment to our lab could not be taken inside immediately at its arrival, as it had live termite all over it. All the life stages of a termite could be seen on the huge framed photograph. It was extremely difficult to control…

Should the importance and value of painting or heritage object decide the methodology of conservation? How much time, efforts and money should be put in conserving or restoring it?

Some objects and art work is priceless because of its historic or cultural value. It is wise to make a highly trained and educated conservator do it’s conservation with most expensive conservation grade material taking days and days of labour. But, if the work is of value only to the owner and he/she want to…

Conservation Lab: removing old repairs

Many a times while treating certain artifacts, specially on paper, one might feel that certain old repairs or treatments might be kept as such. But, when we proceed with the treatment we find that it was better if everything added as a repair was removed before starting our own treatment. Removing old repairs or not…

Getting ready for next workshop: March 2019!

Another opportunity for budding conservators to understand and learn: Conservation scenario in India The basic material and techniques used in archival conservation The basic materials and techniques in oil painting (on canvas) conservation possible job and business prospects Queries can be send here: Some glimpses from earlier workshops:

Bookworms love spines of books and hate anoxic environment

Its our experience that insects that damage books are mainly attacking spine. This is because the spine receives liberal amount of adhesive while book making. After eradicating all the various stages of insects thriving in the books, book conservators repair damaged and deteriorated bound materials. We treat them further so that readers/researchers can consult them…

Aspergillus niger and Paper

Aspergillus niger is one of the most active cellulolytic fungi. The roll of drawings in the above picture is mainly infested by A. niger and Chaetomium sp. as identified from the cultures isolated from the deteriorating inner-side of the roll. This culture was maintained on potato dextrose agar slants. Following are the digital pictures of…

Paper burnt or eaten?

  This black powdery sheet (!) is not burnt paper, but, paper eaten by fungus. Cellulolytic microorganisms are hiding nicely all around us and are much more destructively powerful than we can expect from the tiny spores. Storage enclosures that were designed and created for protection turned out to be actually working with the deteriogens…

Removing Foxing is doable, but needs thorough understanding and patience too…

In paper conservation literature, there are many ways and materials advised to be used to remove foxing or at least lighten its scars. Here i am not going to suggest what to use, but would like to mention the importance of a thorough knowledge of chemistry and physics too apart from the deep appreciation of…